Might As Well Jump – Oxygen Magazine


The aim of plyometrics is to generate the strongest contraction possible in the shortest amount of time — like stretching and shooting a rubber band across the room. “Plyometrics are used to develop and enhance explosiveness in athletes to improve sport-specific skills and performance,” explains Jim Smith, CSCS, and owner of Diesel Strength & Conditioning in Elmira, N.Y. They also burn a ton of fat by forcing your body out of its comfort zone, creating a metabolic disturbance and asking your muscles to react differently than they would during a typical cardio or weight-training session.

Do this workout once or twice a week, leaving at least two full days in between. You also can cycle one of these moves per week into your leg-training plan to put a little kick in your routine.

Workout Guidelines:

  • Start with a dynamic warm-up such as arm swings, squats and jumping jacks.
  • Practice each move slowly to get the mechanics down before going all out.
  • Do all reps for each exercise in a row with no rest in between.
  • Go all out, going as hard, fast and high as you can for each rep.
  • Always land softly, absorbing the impact with your muscles, not your joints.
  • Cool down for five to 10 minutes with some light cardio, and finish up with static or dynamic stretching.

Your Sky-High Plyo Plan

Follow the reps, rest periods and circuits for your level as shown.

Level

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Reps

6

10

Up to 15

Rest Between Exercises

15 seconds

10–15 seconds

10–15 seconds

Number of Circuits

1

2

3

Rest Between Circuits

n/a

3 minutes

3 minutes

One-Legged Forward Hop

One-Legged-Forward-Hop

Targets: quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves





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